Holy Saturday: O Mensch, bewein’ dein Sünde gross. Bach BWV 622

O Mensch, bewein’ dein Sünde groß

A Meditation on Christ’s Sacrifice for our Sins

O Man, Bemoan thy Grievous Sins, Bach BWV 622

English Translation:

O Man, bemoan thy grievous sins

For which Christ left His Father’s

Bosom and came down to earth

And was born for us of a pure

And tender Virgin as He wished

To become our Mediator. He raised

The dead to life, healed the sick

Until the time appointed for Him

To be sacrificed for us, when He

Bore the heavy burden of our sins

On the Cross.

Performed by Ana Elias, church of “O.-L.-Vrouw-o/d-Dijle”, Mechelen (Belgium)

Maundy Thursday–A Room for all Time 2010

A Room for All Time

Jesus knew what he wanted. It was time to prepare for the Passover. Jesus knew it would be his last Passover and his last meal. And so he wanted a room that would hold all of his closest disciples, the Twelve, and probably those few other men and women whom Jesus loved most. He sent Peter and John to arrange the room and the meal. The owner of the house is not named, but undoubtedly he was one of Jesus’ followers. The room was large and on the second story of the house. The room was perfect–perfect for the One who would make this a room for all time.

For over a thousand years the Jews had celebrated the Passover in rooms like this one. But Jesus was standing history on its head, and now this room would witness an act of God’s grace. For in that room Jesus spoke the words, “This is my body, which is given for you” and “This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood.” As Jesus spoke those words, God’s presence was no longer hidden away in the Temple in the Holy of Holies. For the rest of all time, God would be present in any room, or place, in which the words were spoken and the meal partaken.

Yes, Jesus knew what he wanted that night. The Upper Room was the place where Jesus declared himself to be God’s greatest gift to creation, where through his death on the cross, all humans would find salvation.

As you eat the bread and drink the cup today, let us all give thanks to God for His presence in this room at this very moment.

August 15, 2004

This communion meditation was originally presented at Northwood Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Springfield, Oregon.

In Memoriam–Rev. R. Edward McIndoo, 1936-2010

In Memoriam

Ray Edward (Ed) McIndoo

1936-2010

 

Ed McIndoo, Pastor, Professor & Chaplain. Photo: Northwest Christian University

Obituary from the Eugene Register Guard:

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, March 29, at the First Congregational Church in Eugene for Ray Edward McIndoo of Springfield, who died March 24 of leukemia. He was 73.

He was born July 12, 1936, in Jewell County, Kan., to Ray and Theda Aubushon McIndoo. He married Connie Pierson on July 18, 1955, in Caldwell, Idaho.

[It should also be noted that Ed was a graduate of Northwest Christian College (now University) in the Class of 1958, and completed his seminary work at Phillips Graduate Seminary.]

He served as pastor at churches in Oklahoma, Colorado and Ontario, Ore., as well as Springfield Christian Church and St. Paul Methodist Church in Springfield. He served as [hospital and] hospice chaplain at Censored by Corporate Social Media Policy* and as professor at Northwest Christian University.

Survivors include his wife; two daughters, Pamela Starks of Bonaire, Ga., and Lynette Greco of Folsom, Calif.; a brother, Cecil of Greenleaf, Idaho; a sister, Hazel Macy of Newberg; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

Hope was one of the keys to Ed’s spiritual life as a minister of the Gospel of Christ.  This video on Hope is set to the music of Secret Garden and the piece “Celebration” from their album “White Stone.”

 

Shalom, my friend, mentor, colleague and brother in Christ.

 

*This post has been redacted and censored to comply with my employer’s Social Media Policy as of Nov. 1, 2010.  All references to my place of work and the system it is part of, as well as photos have been removed.  This action appears to be only recourse I have to preserve my Constitutional rights to free speech and the free expression of my views on Extreme Thinkover.