Landing the Health Care Reform Bill: It Feels Like Apollo 11 Redux

The voyage of the legislation to create a Health Care Reform Bill has all the

Sen. Harry Reid Launches Health Care Reform in U.S. Senate. Photo credit: C-Span

emotional elements of landing Apollo 11 on the Moon in July 1969.  Health Care reform has been a long, complex mission with an uncertain outcome.  Is it an overstatement to say that landing on the Moon and returning to Earth was an easier and safer endeavor than getting the Health Care Reform Bills passed, conferenced and onto the President’s desk for signature?

At this moment, it seems almost to be the case.

When Neil Armstrong took manual control of the lunar lander to find a safe spot to set down, a thousand different things could have gone wrong.  In fact, alarms were going off in the cockpit.

As the Eagle’s landing radar acquired the surface, several computer error alarms appeared. The first was a code 1202 alarm and even with their extensive training Armstrong or Aldrin were not aware of what this code meant. However, they promptly received word from CAPCOM in Houston that the alarms were not a concern. The 1202 and 1201 alarms were caused by a processing overflow in the lunar module computer. As described by Buzz Aldrin in the documentary In the Shadow of the Moon, the overflow condition was caused by his own counter-checklist choice of leaving the docking radar on during the landing process. Aldrin stated that he did so with the objective of facilitating re-docking with the CM should an abort become necessary, not realizing that it would cause the overflow condition.  Source: Wikipedia

Eagle Lunar Lander just seconds after separation, Apollo 11, July 1969, Photo: NASA

It’s one thing to read about it.  As we close this 40th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Landing, it really is much more satisfying to watch it.  This video is one continuous shot of approximately the final 10 minutes of the descent and landing, viewed from the right window of the LEM.  The audio is quite good, as well.  Watching it still stirs in me that sense of excitement I felt as a 16 year old kid glued to the TV set with my family.

[For a similar, but NASA produced video, click HERE.  This is the final approach, and included is an inset window that tracks the Lander’s progress crater by crater.  It provides a sense of perspective for the approach.]

Regarding the impending passage of the Senate bill and then the conference process, if you tend more toward the pessimistic side, you probably agree with Jonathan Cohn of The New Republic:

If your standard for comparison is your ideal health care reform, then of course this will be disappointing. Like every bill that’s moved through Congress, this one would leave millions uninsured even after full implementation–and leave millions with coverage facing substantial, although generally not crippling, financial burdens. It would introduce some reforms to the delivery system and, according to the official cost estimates, generate budget surpluses over time. But it’s not going to radically turn American health care into a paragon of cost efficiency.

If you tend more to the optimistic side, you probably agree with Paul Krugman of The New York Times:

Let me say that I get especially, um, annoyed at people who say that the plan isn’t really covering the uninsured, it’s just forcing them to buy insurance. That’s missing not just the community rating aspect, but even more important, it’s missing the subsidies. And we’re talking about big stuff: between Medicaid expansion and further support for families above the poverty line, we’re looking at around $200 billion a year a decade from now. Yes, a fraction of that will go to insurance industry profits. But the great bulk will go to making health care affordable.

So how anyone can call a plan to spend $200 billion a year on Americans in need a defeat for progressives is a mystery.

I wish there were a public option in there; I wish there were broader access to the exchanges; I wish the subsidies were even bigger. There’s lots of work to be done, work that may eventually culminate in a true, not simulated, single payer system. But even in this form, we’re looking at something that will make America a more just, more secure nation.

If you are a Republican or Tea Party Advocate, you are most likely hoping and praying the Health Care Reform bill will suffer the fate of the Soviet Luna 15 Lunar Lander Probe that was launched three days before Apollo 11:

Luna 15, launched only three days before the historic Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, was the third Soviet attempt to recover and bring lunar soil back to Earth. The spacecraft was capable of studying circumlunar space, the lunar gravitational field, and the chemical composition of lunar rocks… After completing 86 communications sessions and 52 orbits of the Moon at various inclinations and altitudes it began its descent. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin had already set foot on the Moon when Luna 15 fired its main retrorocket engine to initiate descent to the surface at 15:47 UT on 21 July 1969. Unfortunately, transmissions ceased only 4 minutes after deorbit at a calculated altitude of 3 kilometers. The spacecraft impacted the lunar surface on July 21, 1969. The spacecraft had probably crashed onto the side of a mountain.   Source: Wikipedia.

Launched 3 days before Apollo 11, the USSR's unmanned Luna 15 crashed onto the Moon's surface just hours after the Eagle had safely landed with Armstrong & Aldrin on board.

I’ll give House Minority Leader, Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) the final word…

Photo courtesy Politico.com & BlueStateDigital.com

No, I think I’ll give this Tea Party protester the final word.  Just like the rest of us loyal and patriotic Amurricans, life without spell-check is worse than…oh, wait, he spelled the word right.  In high school he clearly decided to protest which sections of Mrs. Dewey’s English classes were not patriotic enough, because he was getting this way-too-liberal education paid for through public taxation.  And those unacceptable sections happened to include homonyms and writing complete sentences.  I think his pointy hat needs to be cone not a tri-corner.

A Tea Party Protester: The Epitome of the Well-Educated American. Photo: ImageShack

Sniffer Report: AHIP Pushed the Button and…

The Sniffer

The Sniffer

e=mc2 (Excessive-influence = moola x congressional-greed squared)

America’s Health Insurance Plans pushed the button on their “nuclear option” bomb to blast health care reform into oblivion.  The safety was released, the countdown went to zero, and “click!”

This is what AHIP and Big Medicine wanted to hear:

bravo_test_s atomic mushroom cloud(Click on the photo)

Instead they heard this, from the President of the United States:

In fact, the insurance industry is rolling out the big guns and breaking open their massive war chest – to marshal their forces for one last fight to save the status quo. They’re filling the airwaves with deceptive and dishonest ads. They’re flooding Capitol Hill with lobbyists and campaign contributions. And they’re funding studies designed to mislead the American people.

It’s smoke and mirrors. It’s bogus. And it’s all too familiar. Every time we get close to passing reform, the insurance companies produce these phony studies as a prescription and say, “Take one of these, and call us in a decade.” Well, not this time. The fact is, the insurance industry is making this last-ditch effort to stop reform even as costs continue to rise and our health care dollars continue to be poured into their profits, bonuses, and administrative costs that do nothing to make us healthy – that often actually go toward figuring out how to avoid covering people. And they’re earning these profits and bonuses while enjoying a privileged exception from our anti-trust laws, a matter that Congress is rightfully reviewing.

Don’t think for one second that AHIP has conceded or surrendered.  As the bills move through the process of being reconciled, the intensity of the pressure on Congress and YOU and ME, will intensify into a political nuclear storm, the likes of which we have never seen.  The days before the final votes in the Senate and the House will be filled with a Big Medicine-financed noise that would turn an Orc to stone.

President Obama, however, did not stop there:

Last November, the American people went to the polls in historic numbers and demanded change. They wanted a change in our policies; but they also sought a change in our politics: a politics that too often has fallen prey to the lobbyists and the special interests; that has fostered division and sustained the status quo. Passing health insurance reform is a great test of this proposition. Yes, it will make a profound and positive difference in the lives of the American people. But it also now represents something more: whether or not we as a nation are capable of tackling our toughest challenges, if we can serve the national interest despite the unrelenting efforts of the special interests; if we can still do big things in America.

I repeat here what I posted on August 15, 2009:

There are times in the history of a nation, that certain reforms, regardless of the opposition, and, yes, even despite the fears of some must be overcome and guaranteed for all as part of the Common Good.  One of those times was the Emancipation Proclamation abolishing slavery.  One of those times was the ratification of the 19th Amendment of the Constitution of the United States granting women the right to vote.  One of those times was Brown v. The Board of Education decision of the United States Supreme Court that revolutionized equality in education for all U. S. citizens.  Many more could be mentioned.

Now is the time for health care to be added to those moments of sublime national change, to join those great reforms, cast as the finest, hardest steel into our Nation of Laws as an inalienable right and an eternal Blessing of Liberty.


Sniffer Report: The Countdown to Annihilate Health Care Reform is Running

The Sniffer: Big Medicine's Atomic Radiation Detected!

The Sniffer: Big Medicine's Atomic Radiation Detected! Credit: Smith Detection, UK

Update: The Senate Finance Committee voted 14-9 today, 13 Oct, (Olympia Snowe, R-ME, was the sole Republican to vote with the Democratic majority) to pass the Health Care Reform Legislation they have been working on since January.

************

For years Big Medicine–led by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP)–has been planning to obliterate the next attempt at health care reform.  I call it their “nuclear option.”

For the past year I’ve been sleuthing between the lines of the great media Sturm und Drang over health care reform legislation for clues to what AHIP was up to, which turned out to be far easier than I ever imagined. I assumed that they were trying to surreptitiously maneuver their anti-health reform nuclear device into position.  Only it wasn’t very surreptitious.  They were clumsy, overplayed their hand, their corporate brow becoming sweatier by the week.  So, today, AHIP released a study that was supposed to turn us all to stone.  Or something like that.  It had to be outrageously expensive to commission. Therefore the anticipated effect should have been just as extreme, reasserting their ascendancy over all things health care related.  MSNBC reported:

The study commissioned by America’s Health Insurance Plans marked a shift in strategy by the industry, which had been working for months behind the scenes to help shape health care legislation. With the Senate panel set to vote on legislation the industry fears could result in a loss of revenue, the insurers went on the attack, in dramatic fashion.

Maybe MSNBC can’t say AHIP’s plan has come apart at the seams, is in disarray, and the attack is a panic attack, but I can.  I’m writing political commentary.  AHIP should have called PhRMA and asked for a few semi’s filled with tranquilizers sent over to their headquarters.  But then AHIP would have to exercise rescission on itself for a pre-existing condition, a psychiatric anxiety disorder.  Or else, raise the rates on themselves so high for filing a claim that no one in AHIP could afford their own insurance.  To my way of thinking that leaves the Big Wigs of AHIP with the sole option of chewing on their fingernails.

Despite hundreds of millions of our health care dollars spent on lobbying and advertising by AHIP–the money we pay for the health insurance that is supposed to cover our medical costs–the wave of public sentiment, including many progressive politicians, for universal health care, a public option, and a right to medical care has grown higher and stronger.  It has begun to crest, a powerful rolling tube of determination racing toward the shore.

The strategies of Big Medicine, on the other hand, have been not at all as successful as they believed their money and influence should be.  They are angry; they are frustrated.  No one, they believe, has the right to interfere with their carefully crafted system that keeps the people at the top fabulously wealthy while the common rabble who pay them grow less and less healthy, creating desperation for medical care at any price those at the top choose to charge.  No one!  It must be stopped regardless of the consequences.

Today, instead of stunned submission, they got unbridled derision.

As reported by the Associated Press, the new report was immediately blasted for its conspicuous conspicuousness:

Questions about the technical soundness of the industry analysis by the PricewaterhouseCoopers firm was a big part of the discussion Monday. The release of the study late Sunday on the eve of the federal Columbus Day holiday had Democrats crying foul.

“The misleading and harmful claims made by the profit-driven insurance companies are politicking for corporate gain at its worst,” said Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va.

You can read AHIP’s defense of the report by their spokesperson, Nancy Ignagni, who was interviewed by the News Hour’s Margaret Warner, by clicking here.  I watched the interview.  Nancy looked very grim and used lots of insurance jargon as a way to sound quite peckish and put-out with all of us mere peons who immediately recognized this report was the biggest crock of bantha poodoo since George the 43rd declared “Mission Accomplished” in, what was it, 1383.

Courtesy Getty Images

Courtesy Getty Images

Nevertheless, it is zero hour.  The anti-health care reform atomic bomb is in position.  AHIP has its finger on the button.  They will not be trifled with.  The so-called “report” (undoubtedly a work of fiction so cleverly devised it would make Dan Brown envious) is the start of the count-down clock.

Make no mistake about it.  AHIP will push that button.  Only the will of the American People, demanding from the President and the Congress no compromise on the establishment of Universal Health Care will determine whether or not the bomb goes off.

bravo_test_s atomic mushroom cloud

Amputating the Finger to Save the Ring

There are many ways to do things wrong.  A couple of weeks ago I woke up with my left hand seriously swollen.  It was a reasonably good reproduction of the hand of the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Boy.  I headed to the Urgent Care Center to have it looked at.  The first thing out of the nurse’s mouth was, “We’re going to have to cut off your wedding ring.  If it cuts off the circulation anymore, you could lose your finger.”

Cutting off my wedding ring had not been part of the plan.  Although it was very tight, my ring finger didn’t hurt, and I just assumed the doctor would give me something to get rid of the swelling, my hand would return to its normal size, and I’d go my merry way.  Besides, having been married some thirty-two years, I’d guess that easily around twenty years had gone by since I’d even been able to get the ring off.

The decision actually was pretty easy to make.  Gold rings can be repaired and dead fingers can’t.  Within minutes, the nurse and her CNA were sawing away at my ring with a special device designed to cut the metal and not my finger.

Once the ring was sliced through, then came the hard part. Pulling the ring over my hyper-sized fleshy knuckle proved to be the painful part of the process.  As they say, see illustration below:

David's Swollen Hand and Ring Finger

David's Swollen Hand and Ring Finger

Within a few hours, my hand returned to its normal size and I retain a healthy ring finger.  My wedding ring can be repaired, as well.

But as I said in my lede, there are wrong ways to do things.  That happened today in the Senate Finance Committee when two different amendments for a public health plan, supported strongly by at least 65% of Americans according to recent national NYT/CBS poll, were defeated by a combination of Republicans (who have spent zillions of dollars as well as bazillions of hours trying to either wound to kill health care reform) and a group of Democrats (who, in the Senate, are referred to I think as Donkey Blue Dung Beetles).

Here’s my analogy.  The public option is the “ring finger” in the health care reform hand.  It is essential since people hands have had five fingers for a long time.  The ring finger, however, has become controlled by Big Medicine, and they have come up with this outrageous lie that their ring is soooooooo important and big, that the public plan ring finger should be amputated.  See illustration below:

Gigantic Engagement Ring. Credit: www.lovetoknow.com

Gigantic Engagement Ring. Credit: http://www.lovetoknow.com

Yep, save the ring; amputate the finger.  We won’t be able to  wear it on the hand, so we’ll just have to wear it like a crown, to remind us daily that Big Medicine is King/Queen of American Health Care.

Thanks, Max.  You’re doin’ a heckava job there making sure the American health care disaster is complete success.  Heckava job.

Sniffer Report: The RNC Pulls the Trigger on the Nuclear Option to Oppose Health Care Reform—Or Maybe Not?

Sniffer Report: Revised and Updated:

Cue shrill klaxon.  “Detonation in three…two…one…Click…

If you are reading this post from my New York Times comment, “Majority Rule on Health Care Reform,” my guess is you’re madder than a hornet at my criticism of the Republicans, the Republican National Convention led by Michael Steele, and the entire congressional contingent of the GOP.

Sometimes, you write a brilliant, passionate statement, and, well, it doesn’t make it into the comments section of whatever Op-Ed to which you’re replying.  So, if you are reading this post, you’re, heavy sigh, just reading this post because you decided to visit Extreme Thinkover.  Thanks so much for that!  I also appreciate how many of my comments do get published in the New York Times Op-Ed pieces, as well as those by Paul Krugman, and other columnists.

So read what I wrote by clicking here, and then if you are madder than a hornet, etc.,  the next paragraph will make some degree of sense.

Good.  You should be mad.  Just not at me.  You see, for several months I’ve been following and analyzing the organized opposition to health care reform with a hypothesis.  I called it my “radiation sniffer” and even came up with a somewhat tongue-in-cheek image to accompany it:

The Sniffer: Ever vigilant for the tell-tale radiation signature of the nuclear device designed to kill health care reform in one massive blow.

The Sniffer: Ever vigilant for the tell-tale radiation signature of the nuclear device designed to kill health care reform in one massive blow.

The Opponents were planning to ramp up the rhetoric (little did I know how much shouting, screaming, enraged caterwauling that would really entail), and at some point, detonate the equivalent of a nuclear blast to destroy health care reform once and for all.  I’ve called it the “nuclear option.”   I assumed the GOP, in league with various elements of Big Medicine had a strategic plan, which was confirmed when Wendall Potter, former Cigna executive, described in detail how they developed and implemented exactly that.

I honestly thought finding evidence for the Nuclear Option would be tougher to ferret out.  Silly me.  What helped, however, is the proponents of health care reform are actually organized and have their own strategies for countering what the nay-sayers are putting out there.

The trick, though, has been looking for the trigger.  At first I thought it might be the whole, “killing Granny” gambit, but that had run out of steam by mid-August.  The Death Panels, a la Sarah Palin, was astonishing for the traction it got;  it was fun to say (deeeaaath paannnelll), and made a good chant for the Astro-Turfers, but I didn’t think it was the trigger.  Palin is just too much of a loose cannon to have been a key component in the Nuclear Option plan, though her rants probably helped the Opponents stay under budget on their advertising.  The whole Town Hall disruptor concept was really impressive on one level, because it covered the entire August Recess for Congress, but it got old, too, and with the exception of the wing-nuts carrying guns to presidential appearances (notice how deafeningly quiet the NRA has been on that whole thing????), even the recess-mania would have died out sooner.

The drone of the GOP representatives and senators, except when Sen. Grassley, and now Sen. Enzi, say something really inane, has become so much background noise.  Nobody’s heard anything from Boehner or McConnell in a couple of weeks.  Orrin Hatch and John McCain have been caught off guard because they had such good relationships with Teddy Kennedy, whose death from cancer, and valiant fight for life, has to have really messed up the Opponent’s playbook.  They started whining about “not politicizing” his death for Democratic advantage before the poor man’s body was even cold–that’s a clear sign of desperation.  It’s also not going to work.

Enter Michael Steele, chairman of the Republican National Convention.  As August has worn on, Steele has been more vocal.  But he’s got a problem.  He kind of talks with a logic that is a combination of George W. Bush and Sarah Palin, which is to say, unless he’s ticking off the predetermined talking points, he just doesn’t make very good sense.

And face it, he has gotten the whole Medicare thing tied into such a crazy knot, nobody knows what he really believes, much less what he means.  Unless the plan is to get everybody to confused: the Republicans can always claim they are right, which is certainly a possibility.  It doesn’t have to make sense, as long as you can talk in circles so circuitous people lose track of what you’re saying.  I think that’s called a shell game.  It’s great if you’re at a Penn and Teller show in Las Vegas, but if it is coming from the senior executive of a political party that can be elected to govern the country, it’s terrifying.

And now to the “Survey.”

Here’s the actual question #4:

The Worst Survey Question in the History of the World.  Courtesy of the RNC Health Reform Questionaire, August 2009.

The Worst Survey Question in the History of the World. Courtesy of the RNC Health Reform Questionnaire, August 2009.

So, is this the trigger to detonate the Nuclear Option?  Or is it a diversion thrown into the public arena by the GOP/Big Medicine operatives to pull our attention away from what really will be the blast to end all blasts?  It, of course, hit all the blogs, as well as John Stewart’s show, so if this is the trigger, whoever wrote the question will be nominated for the “Inartful Nincompoop” award by the National Association of Survey Question Writers.  It has been suggested that the government of Myanmar could use a survey question writer with exactly these skills.

Ah, but the question is: who will be revealed as having “suggested that the government would use voter registration, etc.?”

The drama is beginning to take on the scope of a Cecil B. DeMille film, only this time named “The Ten Survey Questions” with Michael Steele playing the part of Moses (now that Charlton Heston is dead–BTW, did they ever pry his gun from his cold dead hands–Has the National Enquirer cleared that up, yet?), pleading with Pharaoh Obama (this will send the birthers into fits of apoplexy; his forged birth certificate is from KENYA not EGYPT, you idiots!) to let his people go to escape the inglorious servitude and slavery to a world-standard health care, forced onto their backs by their Democratic taskmasters.

I hope they consult Google Earth before they go.  That last 40 years in the wilderness thing was a real drag.  Besides, mass migrations by 30 or 40 million Republicans with lots of guns and a big chip on their shoulders is going to have some logistic problems, let alone getting visas, parade permits for 40 million, all that stuff.  They can’t even go to Texas and secede.  The Constitution won’t allow it (I looked it up).

But here’s an idea.  Maybe the plan by the GOP/Big Medicine is to unleash ten plagues.  H1N1 already has some folks suspicious it’s a manufactured virus.  But that won’t work, because then you’d need lots of access to medical care for your own people so they’ll survive the plague (lamb’s blood over the door-casing isn’t going to work this time), and the government will have to coordinate the emergency care, and, darnit, you just have to stand on principle and oppose that.

The drama continues.  The Sniffer is working around the clock.

“The envelope please, Mr. Steele.  And the winner is…”   Click.

How the Texas Long Horns and the TCU Horned Frogs Saved Health Care Reform

I just finished watching clips from NBC’s Meet the Press, which featured Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) discussing the status of the “public option” in the health care reform debate. It wasn’t much of a debate, despite host David Gregory’s best effort to provoke something other than party-line blather from either senator.  He wasn’t having much success.

But then, seemingly out of nowhere, Sen. Schumer made a comment that snapped my attention to full alert. He compared the public plan competing against private health insurers with public and private colleges and universities.  (If you watch the clip, it comes right at 2:00 minutes.)  I had to back it up and watch it again to confirm I actually had heard him correctly.  Gregory didn’t catch it, which he should have; Sen. Hatch, if he caught the comment, either had no response, or was so close to dozing off, he just kept mumbling the same old script.  I couldn’t really tell.

Schumer’s statement was a new characterization; I hadn’t heard it before. I’m not sure he even recognized the significance of it.  But it is an intriguing way to look at the public option. And since my PhD is in Higher Education, this is something I actually know something about.

Every state in the country has private and public universities.  Take Texas, for example, where the idea of the public option is more anathema than the Long Horns losing to Oklahoma.  The University of Texas in Austin is a public university.  Texas Christian University (TCU) in Ft Worth, where I earned my Master of Divinity degree, is a private university.

Hook 'em Horns.  University of Texas Football

Hook 'em Horns. University of Texas Football

According to the prevailing dogma of Republican and Free Market devotees, the government should never be allowed to compete against free enterprise and the private market, because the government will always do it worse, waste vast amounts of money in the process and destroy competition, thereby threatening the American Way of Life.

Does the public university “system” in the country drive out the private schools by being too competitive for them to survive? They could in theory, because student tuition in the state schools is subsidized by taxpayer dollars (although that has been shrinking dramatically over the past twenty years–the states all too often are short on cash), attracting more students than the private schools. For example, UT is a lot bigger than TCU (50,000 vs 9,000!). But private colleges, which were the original American academic institutions (Harvard was founded in 1636), continue to compete and flourish, despite the apparent advantage the public schools have. The typical model for what we think of as a state college or university did not come into being until after 1862 with the passage of The Morrill Act.

TCU Frog Fountain and Campus

TCU Frog Fountain and Campus

There are a lot of reasons, but the one relevant to our discussion about health care is that federal financial aid creates portability and allows students to choose (in concept) to attend any school in the country. I have two degrees from private schools and two degrees from a public school. Why did I choose those schools? Because in each instance it offered the academic program I wanted to pursue. Federally funded financial aid guaranteed that I had a choice. That is higher education’s equivalent of a “public option.” (now this isn’t the place to argue about the issues in financial aid such as student loan debt, etc–it is beside the point for this discussion).

We come up with this formula, thanks to Sen. Schumer’s insight:

Federal F/A= Choice + Access + Desired University (public or private) + Academic Degree

So when we look at America’s higher education system, a combination of private and public institutions that arguably is the best in the world (granting it has its own imperfections and needs for reforms), which allow the schools to provide their services in a competitive but mutually beneficial market, and provides students (as consumers) a huge amount of choice, both in program and in cost, it is just plain wrong to say that “government” can’t do anything right and to assume that a public option would destroy competition in the health care market.  The success of higher education contradicts the assumption and renders it null.

We Horned Frogs are justifiably proud of our private Texas Christian University. But if I was a bettin’ man, I wouldn’t place a red-cent on a wager that a University of Texas grad, dead-set against the public plan in health care, would admit that his/her “government education” was inferior in any way, shape or form!

Therefore, applied to the Public Option, the formula becomes:

Federal Public Option= Choice + Access + Desired Coverage (public or private) + Appropriate Medical Care

Responses anyone?

TCU Horned Frog Mascot

TCU Horned Frog Mascot

Go Frogs!

Now is the Time: My Message to President Obama

President Obama, as part of his commitment to secure health care reform published an op-ed piece today in the New York Times, “Why We Need Health Care Reform,” laying out for the American people, and perhaps the world, the case for change.  I am a regular comment contributor to New York Times Op-Ed columns and below you will find the text of my comment.

I ended my comment with the statement: “Now is the time.”  There are times in the history of a nation, that certain reforms, regardless of the opposition, and, yes, even despite the fears of some must be overcome and guaranteed for all as part of the Common Good.  One of those times was the Emancipation Proclamation abolishing slavery.  One of those times was the ratification of the 19th Amendment of the Constitution of the United States granting women the right to vote.  One of those times was Brown v. The Board of Education decision of the United States Supreme Court that revolutionized equality in education for all U. S. citizens.  Many more could be mentioned.

Now is the time for health care to be added to those moments of sublime national change, to join those great reforms, cast as the finest, hardest steel into our Nation of Laws as an inalienable right and an eternal Blessing of Liberty.

Mr. President,

I work in health care, as a hospital chaplain, and I could give you a thousand more stories of real people whose lives have suffered and through their loss of quality of life and productivity America has suffered, simply because they could not afford health care.  I am blessed to work for a non-profit hospital system that treats every person who comes to us, but this is a burden that cannot be sustained.

I support health care reform, universal coverage, and the complete overhaul of our broken and unjust system.  I believe that health care is a constitutional right, just as freedom from slavery, women’s suffrage, and equality in education has become enshrined among the “Blessings of Liberty.”

I urge you to be courageous and strong to fight for every American’s right to medical care, as a blessing of Liberty that will build a foundation for a healthy America into the future.  Now is the time!